NOSTALGIA AT DUNN’S CASTLE


Another February travel piece belatedly staggers into print  …
If  live in the Western Cape and  have ever wondered where our bread comes from, wonder no more, because we drove through huge areas planted with wheat, rolling wheatfields as far as the eye could see, in the Swartland area.

Helen and I drove around this area in February, exploring small towns en route, notably Piketberg and Porterville. I think my favourite discovery in Piketberg was a small garage on the outskirts of the town, named Voortrekker Garage.

dav

The faded wall picture of a 1930s type car, said it all. There was no plate glass, no fancy cars parked outside, this was strictly about fixing broken down cars. I found the name amusing, because the doughty Voortrekkers owned no cars, their was an era of ox wagons, a pre-car agricultural age.

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The other Piketberg building that I loved, because of its colour, was the old Synagogue painted a pretty baby pink colour. I loved the pink colour contrasted with the bright blue sky above the hilltops. As my bad photo shows, synagogue on the left.  In actuality the pink colour is more pronounced than in  my photo, despite my efforts to tinker with it.  Now the building serves as a Museum, but in its heyday it served the immigrant European  Jewish farming population.

Our overnight stop was at Dunn’s Castle . If you follow the link you’ll find a splendid night-shot of the imposing frontage. https://www.kwathabeng.co.za/go/dunnscastle.html
What the website doesn’t show you is the narrow, torturous road that wound up a very sizeable hill to the castle.

dav
We opted to stay inside the castle itself, and not in the modern conference block. As my pics show, it was a nostalgia trip of note. Both of us kept saying: look at this! And pointing to an antique sewing machine, or a 1950s style radiogram – most Rhodesian homes had a radiogram, in the late ‘50s.

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My vast bedroom‘s bow-fronted window looked out onto the rolling hills and wheatfields.

 

IMG_20190214_073807.jpgThe wooden strip flooring creaked gently, and the prettily carved wooden wardrobe smelled deliciously of mothballs – of course it did.

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Best of all, hiding behind a wooden screen was a ball and claw enamel bathtub, and alongside was a lavatory with a de rigeur pull chain flush from the wall mounted cistern. What memories these evoked! Farm bathrooms and toilets, back in the early 1950/60s. All lavatories had wall mounted cisterns with a dangling chain, usually much too high for kids to reach, and in some cases, short adults, i.e. me.

We loved our trip back in time. The food and service at Dunns Castle : not so much. Lets leave it at that and focus on the nostalgia.

5 Comments

Filed under EXPLORING CAPE TOWN, TRAVEL

5 responses to “NOSTALGIA AT DUNN’S CASTLE

  1. I grew up on a farm with a bath like that in a huge bathroom. Of course I had no idea it would become the in thing. I just wished we had a modern 3 piece suite like the rest of my friends parents, probably in avocado. Lol. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Charlotte

    Beautiful piece and beautiful pictures of the Swartland area, Alison… and the memory of the peace, tranquility and quiet dignity which epitomised the farmlands and small towns of South Africa. … Oh, how I wish I could be there now.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. That hotel looks fabulous! Shame about the service. I too remember “pulling the chain” and wardrobes like that one. Common in manses as well as farmhouses I think.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lovely stories, Alison. I enjoy reading your travelogues and seeing the world through your eyes like this. I too remember those high wall-mounted cisterns with the pull-chain… and the creaking wooden floors… oh, your friend Shazza mentioned the avocado bathroom! 😀 Glad you enjoyed your roadtrip, Alison.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Pingback: July 2019 Wrap-Up - ECONOGAL

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